Health Is Social

Infusing Social Media into Healthcare

The Klout Trap – It’s Unhealthy

Klout isn’t healthy.

Klout represents the pathway which social media can take into narcissism.

It’s also dumb. Just dumb. I’ve noticed lately that some friends in the #HCSM domain are in awe of Klout – and specific hospitals have boasted about their scores.

This is unfortunate.

To me, such boasting suggests a complete lack of any understanding of how to get things done – in Healthcare or Marketing.

I am Phil Baumann. I influence what I influence. If I decide I want to be heard – believe me, I’m heard. If I decide to clear a way to new land in a new century, I clear the land.

That’s Phil Baumann doing all the work – not his Klout score.

Are you a soldier? Or are you an army of potters, sculptors and blacksmiths going into battle with no idea on how to fight?

You either have presence or you don’t. You either have brilliance or you don’t. You either know how to lead community or you don’t. You either know how to use social media and other technologies artfully or you don’t. You either have a fight worthy of fighting or you don’t. You either have passion to fight or you don’t.

Numbers crunched by a stupid company have nothing to do with it.

Discipline. Fidelity. Intelligence. Those matter.

Klout? You must be kidding.

[Oh, and if you haven’t thought about all of the implications, read this. Yes, you do have to think about this stuff – and not be superficial.]

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Phil Baumann

@HealthIsSocial

484-362-0451

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  • Phil – I totally agree with your comments

    I think that Klout is fine if you are a person who is influential in the media world but for 99% of the population (forgive the Occupy Wall St ref) this doesn’t matter as I truly only care about what people think within my own social networks. I have a site called Cliqsearch.com and we care about influential people in media in order to get coverage but the greatest benefit to our consumers and businesses, products and places that are on our site is to identify those ‘normal’ people who are the biggest influencers. My friend who has been to a restaurant or used a local service such as a contractor is infinitely more valuable to me than Robert Scoble suggesting the same thing.
    I haven’t crunched the numbers but for the <1% of major influencers out there, how many people do they truly influence vs the influence that comes from their close ties in their social networks? My guess is that ultimately the opinion of the <1% doesn't influence much (lest say people such as Steve Jobs).
    Interested in your thoughts.

  • Phil – I totally agree with your comments

    I think that Klout is fine if you are a person who is influential in the media world but for 99% of the population (forgive the Occupy Wall St ref) this doesn’t matter as I truly only care about what people think within my own social networks. I have a site called Cliqsearch.com and we care about influential people in media in order to get coverage but the greatest benefit to our consumers and businesses, products and places that are on our site is to identify those ‘normal’ people who are the biggest influencers. My friend who has been to a restaurant or used a local service such as a contractor is infinitely more valuable to me than Robert Scoble suggesting the same thing.
    I haven’t crunched the numbers but for the <1% of major influencers out there, how many people do they truly influence vs the influence that comes from their close ties in their social networks? My guess is that ultimately the opinion of the <1% doesn't influence much (lest say people such as Steve Jobs).
    Interested in your thoughts.

  • I signed up for Klout, realized the ethos and have not been back despite notices of friends – who I’m sure are acting in good faith.
    Noting your focus and blog title Phil and your previous post on analogue – digital distinctions you and your readers may find Hodges’ model of relevance? The model includes ‘SOCIOLOGY’ as a knowledge (care) domain and incorporates the HUMANISTIC and MECHANISTIC (socio-technical) aspects of health.
    Best regards,
    Peter Jones
    Lancashire, UK
    Blogging at “Welcome to the QUAD”
    http://hodges-model.blogspot.com/
    Hodges Health Career – Care Domains – Model
    http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/
    h2cm: help 2C more – help 2 listen – help 2 care
    http://twitter.com/#!/h2cm